Journal behaviors towards teen dating violence


Researchers agree that women suffer the lion’s share of injuries from domestic violence.[15] Women living as partners with other women report lower rates of violence (11 percent) compared to women who live with or were married to men (30 percent).[16]About 8 percent of men living with or married to women report that they were physically abused by the women.

About 15 percent of men cohabitating with men reported victimization by a male partner.

Domestic violence tends to be underreported: women report only one-quarter to one-half of their assaults to police, men perhaps less.[2]The vast majority of physical assaults are not life threatening; rather, they involve pushing, slapping, and hitting.[3]Most women victims of domestic violence do not seek medical treatment, even for injuries deserving of it.[4] Surveys provide us with estimates of the level of domestic violence in the United States, but there are wide differences among them depending on the definitions of domestic violence used and populations surveyed.[5]Two large surveys provide some insight into the level of domestic violence in the United States. The survey attempts to capture two types of crime, victimization that was reported to the police and victimization that was not reported to the police. ††† The NCVS, administered by census workers as part of a crime survey, does not conduct all of its interviews in private because all members of the household are interviewed for different portions of the survey; also in contrast, the NVAWS survey uses more questions to screen for intimate violence, perhaps drawing out more from those interviewed.

The first, the National Violence Against Women Survey (NVAWS), conducted in 1995 and1996, found that nearly one in four women and nearly one in 13 men surveyed experienced rape and/or physical assault by a current or former spouse/partner/dating partner at some time in their lifetime, with about one and one-half percent of women and about one percent of men having been so victimized in the 12 months before the survey.[6]The National Crime Victimization Survey’s (NCVS) estimates, however, are about one-third lower for women and more than two-thirds lower for men. Even the lower numbers of the NCVS suggest that intimate partner violence in the United States is extensive. “Characteristics of Participants in Domestic Violence: Assessment at the Scene of Domestic Assault.” JAMA: The Journal of the American Medical Association, 277(17):1369-1373.

Victims may lose their jobs because of absenteeism related to the violence, and may even lose their homes because of loss of income.

Some domestic violence victims must rely on shelters or depend on others to house them, and others become part of a community’s homeless population, increasing their risk for other types of victimization. [99] Fagan (1996)[Full Text]; also see Healey et al.

In addition to the physical harm victims suffer, domestic violence results in emotional harm to victims, their children, other family members, friends, neighbors, and co-workers.